Get up again! – Abba Sisoes

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Another brother asked Abba Sisoes, “I have fallen, Abba; what shall I do?” The elder said to him, “Get up again.” The brother said, “I have gotten up again, but again have I fallen.” The elder said, “Get up again and again.” So the brother asked, “How many times?” The elder replied, “Until you are taken up either in virtue or in sin. For a man presents himself to judgment in that state in which he is found.”

[Apophthegmata Patrum]

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O mystic wonder! The Lord was laid low, and man rose up – St. Clement of Alexandria

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Contemplate a little, if agreeable to you, the divine beneficence. The first man, when in Paradise, sported free, because he was the child of God; but when he succumbed to pleasure (for the serpent allegorically signifies pleasure crawling on its belly, earthly wickedness nourished for fuel to the flames), was as a child seduced by lusts, and grew old in disobedience; and by disobeying his Father, dishonoured God. Such was the influence of pleasure. Man, that had been free by reason of simplicity, was found fettered to sins.

The Lord then wished to release him from his bonds, and clothing Himself with flesh— O divine mystery!— vanquished the serpent, and enslaved the tyrant death; and, most marvellous of all, man that had been deceived by pleasure, and bound fast by corruption, had his hands unloosed, and was set free.

O mystic wonder! The Lord was laid low, and man rose up; and he that fell from Paradise receives as the reward of obedience something greater [than Paradise]— namely, heaven itself.

[St. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation to the Heathen, Chapter XI]

The mark of Christianity – Abba Macarius the Egyptian

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This is the mark of Christianity: however much a man toils, and however many righteousnesses he performs, to feel that he has done nothing, and in fasting to say, “This is not fasting,” and in praying, “This is not prayer,” and in perseverance at prayer, “I have shown no perseverance; I am only just beginning to practice and to take pains “; and even if he is righteous before God, he should say, “I am not righteous, not I; I do not take pains, but only make a beginning every day.

[Abba Macarius the Great, Homily 26]

Stretch forth your hands, not to heaven, but to the poor – St. John Chrysostom

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Make God your debtor, and then offer your prayers. Lend to Him, and then ask a return, and you shall receive it with usury. God wills this, and does not retract. If you ask with alms, He holds himself obliged. If you ask with alms, you lend and receive interest.

Yes, I beseech you! It is not for stretching out your hands you shall be heard! stretch forth your hands, not to heaven, but to the poor. If you stretch forth your hand to the hands of the poor, you have reached the very summit of heaven. For He who sits there receives your alms. But if you lift them up without a gift, you gain nothing.

[St. John Chrysostom, Homily I on Timothy]

A mouth that praises and a heart that is grateful – Mar Isaac the Syrian

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The mouth which constantly praises, receives a blessing from God; the heart which is constantly grateful, is inhabited by grace.

[Mar Isaac the Syrian, Ascetical Homilies, Homily XLV]

Fasting by itself is not a virtue – Fr. Matta El-Meskeen

[Tomorrow, the 16th day of Hatour in the Coptic calendar marks the beginning of the Blessed Fast of the Nativity. May God grant us an acceptable and fruitful fast before Him, to aid us in the salvation of our souls, and to the Glory of His Name.]

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Fasting by itself is not a virtue. It is nothing at all. Without prayer, it becomes a bodily punishment that induces spiritual aridity and bad temper. The same is true of prayer; without fasting, it loses its power along with its fruits.

We may liken fasting to a burning coal and prayer to frankincense. Neither has value without the other, but together, the sweet savour of their incense fills the air.

Fasting calms the impulses of the flesh and quenches the fire of passion; it curbs the prattling of the tongue. Thus, it substantially prepares us for the work of prayer and the release of the spirit from slavery to the flesh. In this way, fasting allows the spirit to contemplate the truths of eternity and the age to come. 

The following constitute spiritual meanings for fasting:

– Fasting is not a deprivation from certain kinds of food, but a voluntary abstinence from them.

– It does not humiliate the flesh, but refreshes the spirit.

– Nor does it fetter or imprison the senses; it releases them from all that hinders the contemplation of God.

– Fasting does not seek to repress the appetite for food. It renounces this appetite and, in renunciation, elevates it to relish the love of God.

– Fasting does not imply confinement or restriction, but aims at joy and magnanimity of heart.

[Fr. Matta El-Meskeen, Orthodox Prayer Life, Chapter 13]

What is fear of God? – Abba Isaiah of Scetis

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Abba Peter said, “I asked him, ‘what is fear of God?’ and he said to me, ‘A person who trusts in anybody who is not God, that person does not have fear of God in himself.'”

[Abba Isaiah of Scetis, Ascetical Discourses, Discourse 26]